Editor's Blog

Editor's Blog
Olga Kudriavtseva's picture

Fashionable Russia

Years when Russian people wore grey, strict monotonous clothes and tried not to show up in a crowd, sank into oblivion together with the other “horrors” of the Soviet era. When the borders to the Western world were opened, Russia got the opportunity to take inspiration from abroad and changed their dress-code.

Twenty years have since passed, but still there are some people who perceive clothes as just a need to hide their nudity. For their daytime routine, they don’t have spare money or time to care about the world famous labels or demanding trends. On the other hand there are others who can afford to be addicted to fashion. They never miss fashion shows in Milan, Paris and London, buy only designer clothes and never appear in public in the same outfit. In Russia the differentiation of society can be seen in the way people dress.

Olga Kudriavtseva's picture

Born in the USSR

I was considered to have been born in the USSR but in reality I grew up in an entirely different country – independent Ukraine after the 15 Republics of Soviet Union separated in 1991.

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What Time Is It Now?

Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than a ninth of the Earth's land area, extending across the whole of northern Asia and 40% of Europe. Moreover Russia spans nine time zones. One could say it is rather confusing. Perhaps it is, but since 2009 the Russian government has been working on reducing the number of time zones in the country. In 2010 two time zones (3 & 11) were abolished. In 2011 all clocks in Russia were advanced one hour to Summer Time but will not change back this coming October.

Nevertheless, there are certain advantages in having that many time zones. For instance you can celebrate New Year several times over. In Vladivostok (the Eastern part of the country) when the New Year has arrived, in Kaliningrad (the Western part) people are only starting their preparations for the holiday. Sometimes it is a good idea to catch up the time and experience the pleasant moments once again.

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Russian Film Pioneers

This May the BFI presents Kino, a major celebration of Russian cinema, with three seasons over six months at BFI Southbank. The first part Kino: Russian Film Pioneers explores how Soviet cinema first set the world on fire in the 1920s, and can still surprise us today.

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My May

One morning I woke up, looked at the calendar, took a deep breath and felt overwhelmed with joy. My most beloved month of the year began.

 

For me May is:

*A great opportunity to change dark, dull, dark winter outfits for some floral dresses and brightly coloured clothing. It is the perfect time to shop for eye stopping colours and jaw dropping lengths until you get so tired that you crawl home, or realistically speaking, until you go red. Even so, it is the perfect time to go nuts.

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The Cult of Body Art

Londoners escaped to the parks to enjoy shiny warm weekends. I was not an exception and relaxed at St James. Wearing sunglasses I was secretly spying people around. Due to the enormous hotness citizens were maximally taking of their clothes. Looking here and there I realised that every second person has tattoos.

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Web Addiction

Few days ago I was trying to log in to the social network where I had my profile but the access for some reason was denied. Weirdly for myself I felt alleviation and I decided to leave it locked and never turn back to it again.

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Moscow City

Moscow changed greatly since the last time I was there. Years ago, I had a very special attitude to this city but  the fortune did not give me a chance to meet with the capital often. Nevertheless it was always in my thoughts and in my heart. Many years after when the long waiting meeting finally occurred, I had a wide range of impressions.

Olga Kudriavtseva's picture

Happy Birthday Dear Mr. Gorbachev

Mikhail Gorbachev “shadowed” me my entire life. My first introduction to who this man is goes far to my childhood when my grandmother was angrily blaming him as the one who destroyed her Motherland. At that time it was difficult for me to understand feelings of the person who one day woke up in the entirely different country. In the high school the subject of Perestroika and the USSR collapse was observed simply as a historical fact accurately avoiding any for and against discussions.